Adopting Policies That Work for BYOD

BYODThe year was 2009 when the mobile phone revolution inspired office workers to begin to break away from their cubes, ushering in freedom from desktops. An emerging trend, bring your own device (BYOD), surfaced across a wide spectrum of industries. While BYOD has since proven to have many benefits, it also has its drawbacks. Here’s a deeper look at the advantages and disadvantages of how portable devices have reshaped IT and the business world.

Costs of Convenience

A significant reason BYOD has become popular is the convenience of workers using their own devices with which they’ve grown comfortable. It’s convenient for management as well, since it frees up the budget for expenses on other needs beyond equipment. At the same time, however, it’s been a nightmare for some IT teams to oversee a wide range of technology that they cannot completely control.

The savings companies enjoy from avoiding desktop purchases are sometimes offset by the processing fees of plan subsidies, greater security risks, and less productivity from workers using their devices for personal use. The fact that employees can take home data that can be compromised by nefarious entities should be cause to look into device management strategies carefully before implementing BYOD.

First, Conduct Sufficient Research

The quickest path to quagmire in the BYOD era is to not bother planning a structured mobile device policy. Thorough research is needed on costs, ease-of-use, platforms, operating systems, models, and security risks. Partial plan policies may look more appealing on the surface than buying devices outright. But management should not overlook processing costs related to employee expense reports, which average around $18 per report, according to a 2013 Aberdeen Group analysis. Each business needs to study its own finances to determine if this model will provide savings.

A BYOD feasibility study also needs to include the potential security breaches that can occur from the vulnerabilities that BYOD introduces. This research (which can include Google, expert blogs, suppliers, software specialists, and business publications) may lead to a narrowed list of mobile device selections for employees to choose from. Comprehensive research will also help managers make the following determinations:

  • Rules and policies for professional vs. personal use
  • Mobile Device Management (MDM) strategies
  • The level of extra work and pressure BYOD will put on IT support
  • Price targets, options, and negotiation strategies

Developing a Company Mobility Plan

After compiling the above information, management should write a detailed company policy that spells out specific rules and regulations. The policy should identify which employees are permitted to use their own personal devices, which types of devices are allowed, and how they may be used in the workplace.

Additionally, the policy should specify who pays for phone and data plans and who is responsible for device maintenance and security. Finally, the policy needs to culminate in a summary of the company’s enforcement policy of rules and regulations.

The Power of MDM 

MDM software, such as IBM’s MaaS360, strengthens mobility policies through passwords. This cross-platform software is affordable, with options ranging from $3 to $10 per month. The software keeps devices locked down when not in use and sets limits on functions so that management can keep employee usage under control. As a security feature, MaaS360 can wipe data from lost or stolen devices.

As long as management does its homework by conducting a cost analysis then setting clear and appropriate policies, BYDO can help enable workers to be more productive at their jobs.

 

VoIP Network Software and Hardware Security

VOIPSince Voice over IP (VoIP) and hosted PBX services are easy to deploy, some small to medium businesses (SMBs) take network security for granted. Enterprise network security requires more attention, but anyone using VoIP is still a target for foreign attacks. Following are areas of concern for management when implementing these modern communication features.

VoIP and Hosted PBX Vulnerabilities 

  • DDoS attacks can indefinitely block business communication.
  • Cyber criminals can listen to phone conversations and steal trade secrets.
  • Spies, ex-employees, or script kiddies can infect a network with ransomware.

Firewalls

Firewalls are simple to set up, as provisions and configurations determine who has access to a network. In other words, firewalls allow users assigned by administrators to access the network, while blocking unfamiliar users.

Businesses commonly use software firewalls on each node of a network to filter traffic based on individual configurations. While a software firewall is easy to implement, it can be expensive due to purchasing of multiple licenses and extra maintenance costs for each machine. Other drawbacks to consider before implementing software firewalls include:

  • Installation on individual computers is time consuming.
  • Users of each machine must be involved in the installation process.
  • Security is weaker, making it easy for hackers to infiltrate.
  • They are not user-friendly for inexperienced computer users, creating confusion and disruption.

The best way to approach network security is to use common sense by staying on top of which connections are allowed by administrators and blocking suspicious users.

Hardware Firewalls Strengthen Security

While software firewalls need to be installed on each network machine, a single hardware firewall can be assigned to the entire network as an extra protective layer. Whatever work needs to be done in terms of provisions, configurations, monitoring, or maintenance can be executed on one computer. This quicker approach does not require as much participation from individual users.

Packet loss can be avoided across the network, as security managers can configure a hardware firewall when necessary so that traffic is prioritized separately for VoIP or video conferencing. Maintenance and monitoring will still need to be overseen by IT personnel. Hardware firewalls may integrate with a Virtual Private Network (VPN) for encrypted connections, which entails:

  • Time consuming initial installation but to a lesser degree than a software firewall
  • Prioritizing VoIP and video data for a jitter free, smooth, and secure experience
  • Reduced restrictions on permissioned users
  • Less need to train workers on how to make network access decisions

Cloud Managed Firewalls 

Investing in a hardware firewall clearly provides more efficiency and stronger protection than a software firewall, and can work as a premises, network, or cloud solution. A cloud service provider may be the most efficient solution for businesses that prefer IT services to be managed by an offsite third party. Even though a managed firewall often requires hardware to be connected to the network, most cloud service providers will handle maintenance, provisioning, and monitoring from their data center.

Furthermore, they can provide continuous firewall administration, monitoring, and quick response to security issues. Quality cloud providers manage firewalls using reliable brands such as Cisco, Dell Security, and Verizon Enterprise Solutions or niche competitors such as Secure Works or Simple WAN.

Conclusion  

SMBs that use VoIP and hosted PBX can improve security with a hardware firewall that protects every computer on a network. Some companies choose to install software firewalls on individual computers, but this strategy can run up costs. Companies that would rather not worry about the nuts and bolts of IT work should consider cloud managed services.